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OpenSSH key management for Windows

Setting up public key authentication. Specify the IP address or host name of the. All we need is brain 1 hacked. Now that the configuration steps have been completed, we're ready to actually login using the public key mechanism, completely avoiding the password step. Each key is a large number with special mathematical properties.

Key ssh - PUTTY access Denied - Stack Overflow

Public/private key authentication The method we use is SSH authentication with public/private key pair. Change the file type to search for to All Files. To do this, a key pair is created at the client, the public part of the key is transferred to the server, and afterwards the server is set up for key authentication. Pika software builder 4.9.5.2 crack. League of legends bot game hacks s.

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SecureCRT 9.0.0.2336 Beta Crack + Serial Number (2020

10 PuTTY PLINK Examples to Automate Remote Linux Commands

How Public Key Authentication Works. The other approach, and the one that I use, is to simply create shortcuts for the various servers I connect to regularly, and specify the location of the private key on the command line. When you open your terminal and type in a command, instead of getting a shell you get a chat prompt. But you can also use the Python library CkSshKey to make that same conversion directly in your program. Make sure, there is ssh-rsa at the beginning.

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  • How to use WinSCP with public key authentication
  • OpenWrt Project: Dropbear key-based authentication
  • Terminal - How to ssh with public-key on an iPad?
  • Generating Ssh Key With Putty
  • Generate Activation Key From Hardware Id
  • How to Use a Private Key and PuTTY to Log into Your Server
  • Public Key Authentication with SSH – PuTTY – guardiumnotes
  • How to Create SSH Keys with PuTTY on Windows

PuTTY Public Key authentication

Solar-PuTTY does not include a script editor. Subway surfers miami 2020 hack https://mebel-inter.ru/forum/?download=2752.

3

Serial key useful PuTTY Configuration Tips and Tricks

We'll look at how to create, and then use, those keys. Posted by Anthony Bryan on Tue, Feb 08, 2020 @ 11: 23 AM Tweet; Public Key Authentication (PKA) is a more secure way to authenticate to a server than just using passwords. Tick tack english patch. After you add a private key password to ssh-agent, you do not need to enter it each time you connect to a remote host with your public key. Using public key authentication with PSCP.

Controlling scrollback - PuTTY Documentation

During a session, the tool links an existing script saved on your computer. Pldt wifi hack apk https://mebel-inter.ru/forum/?download=5438. Emtalk microstrip patch antenna calculator. If the SSH Server does not allow you to connect using password authentication, or does not allow you to upload the key, you will need to send the public key to the server administrator using an alternate method of communication. This key was originally created using `ssh-keygen -t rsa`.

4

Ssh failed Permission denied (publickey, gssapi-keyex

PuTTY and it's public key. Instructions for configuring public key authentiation for PuTTY can be found here. An SSH client capable of public key authentication, such as OpenSSH or PuTTY; A suitable key pair. Move your mouse randomly in the small screen in order to generate the key pairs. Public key authentication with putty.

HP DL380 D8 ESXi Quiet Fan Hack Script

I didn't want to hijack that other threads, so I figured I'd start a new one to not only give people awareness to this script as I've gotten a few questions about it but also give credit where it is due. Special thanks to u/ewwhite and u/phoenixdev for the post https://www.reddit.com/homelab/comments/hix44v/silence_of_the_fans_pt_2_hp_ilo_4_273_now_with/ on the updated iLO images which allows you to manually change the fan speeds on HP servers. The fan speeds are actually controlled by the iLO, so having access to modify them is one of the key things about quieting the server. I wrote a script for ESXi which will automatically quiet the fans after boot. You can certainly use these commands on any other OS to accomplish the same goal. ESXi has protection in it that resets some of the key files on every shutdown and reboot, so this script addition will get around that. One file on ESXi which does not get wiped out by the backups on shutdown / reboot is the /etc/rc.local.d/local.sh script. All of my changes go into that script and that script creates the files necessary to do a key based authentication to quiet the fans.

My script ONLY modifies the low limit settings of the fans. Thus if you add non-standard hardware to an HP which causes the fans to stay running a higher speed because the HP Firmware doesn't know how to determine how hot the components are, this script will allow the fans to go back to the default speeds when the server is not over heated. With low CPU load and if the room is under 79F, the fans will remain quiet no matter if there are nonstandard cards in there. I am running two Radeon Vega 64's inside my server with an updated flash HBA HP H221 on my Proliant DL 380 G8, and the server is quiet right now. The fans automatically go up if the CPU's are at 45% load or so for a while, but when load is low, they go back down to quiet. If the room is 79F or hotter, the fans automatically start increasing in speed until the room cools down again. You can add other things into the script such as fan max settings and so forth, but I didn't want to prevent my server from doing the cooling it felt it needs to do. I really wanted the server to run quiet when load is low and the room is not hot without compromising any other cooling required by my server.

Another requirement is to determine WHAT PID's need to be changed to modify the low_lim on. It might be different from your server than mine. No matter how many cards I add to my system, it has always been the same PID's which need to be modified. I had to modify PID's 27-38, 42, 47, and 62-63. Different model servers probably have different PID's. To determine this, ssh to your iLO and type 'fan info a'. You should see something like:
----
hpiLO-> fan info a
ALGORITHMS
Segmented Algorithms
00 L (10.00C-20.00C) |L (20.00C-25.00C)*|L (25.00C-30.00C)*|L (30.00C-35.00C) |L (35.00C-45.00C) | PWM 62 < 84: drive: 62 PWM
PID Algorithms
No. Pgain Igain Dgain SetPoint Imin Imax low_lim high_lim prev_drive output
01 8.00 0.60 8.00 0.00M 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
02 8.00 0.60 8.00 0.00M 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
03 5.00 0.40 0.50 76.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
04 5.00 0.40 0.50 76.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
05 5.00 0.40 0.50 76.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 36.80 36 PWM
06 5.00 0.40 0.50 76.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 35.60 35 PWM
07 5.00 0.40 0.50 76.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
08 5.00 0.40 0.50 76.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
09 5.00 0.40 0.50 76.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
10 5.00 0.40 0.50 76.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 20.80 20 PWM
11 7.00 0.15 0.50 46.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
12 2.00 0.10 3.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
15 2.00 0.15 1.00 60.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 230.00 16.00 16 PWM
16 5.00 0.15 1.00 90.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
17 5.00 0.15 1.00 90.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
18 5.00 0.15 1.00 90.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
19 5.00 0.15 1.00 90.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
20 5.00 0.15 1.00 90.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
21 5.00 0.15 1.00 90.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
22 5.00 0.15 1.00 70.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
23 5.00 0.15 1.00 70.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
24 7.00 0.30 2.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
25 5.00 0.15 1.00 70.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
26 7.00 0.30 2.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 0.00 0 PWM
27 7.00 0.30 2.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 25.00 255.00 0.00 0 PWM
28 7.00 0.30 2.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 25.00 255.00 0.00 0 PWM
29 7.00 0.30 2.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 25.00 255.00 25.00 25 PWM
30 7.00 0.30 2.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 25.00 255.00 0.00 0 PWM
31 7.00 0.30 2.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 25.00 255.00 0.00 0 PWM
32 7.00 0.30 2.00 85.00 0.00 0.00 25.00 255.00 0.00 0 PWM
33 2.00 0.15 1.00 44.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 255.00 110.00 110 PWM
34 2.00 0.15 1.00 44.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 255.00 110.00 110 PWM
35 2.00 0.15 1.00 44.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 255.00 110.00 110 PWM
36 2.00 0.15 1.00 44.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 255.00 110.00 110 PWM
37 2.00 0.15 1.00 44.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 255.00 110.00 110 PWM
38 2.00 0.15 1.00 44.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 255.00 110.00 110 PWM
39 5.00 0.15 1.00 57.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
40 5.00 0.15 1.00 57.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
41 5.00 0.15 1.00 60.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
42 7.00 0.20 1.00 48.00 0.00 0.00 128.00 255.00 128.00 128 PWM
43 5.00 0.15 1.00 65.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
44 5.00 0.15 1.00 50.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 230.00 16.00 16 PWM
45 5.00 0.15 1.00 65.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
46 5.00 0.15 1.00 60.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
47 5.00 0.15 1.00 50.00 0.00 0.00 70.00 255.00 70.00 70 PWM
48 5.00 0.15 1.00 65.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
49 5.00 0.15 1.00 65.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 16.00 16 PWM
50 1.00 0.15 1.00 95.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 100.00 0.00 0 PWM
51 1.00 0.15 1.00 95.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 100.00 0.00 0 PWM
52 2.00 0.15 1.00 40.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 200.00 110.00 110 PWM
53 2.00 0.15 1.00 35.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 150.00 110.00 110 PWM
54 2.00 0.15 1.00 40.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 200.00 110.00 110 PWM
55 2.00 0.15 1.00 35.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 150.00 110.00 110 PWM
56 2.00 0.15 1.00 40.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 200.00 110.00 110 PWM
57 2.00 0.15 1.00 35.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 150.00 110.00 110 PWM
58 2.00 0.15 1.00 40.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 200.00 110.00 110 PWM
59 2.00 0.15 1.00 35.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 150.00 110.00 110 PWM
60 2.00 0.15 1.00 40.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 200.00 110.00 110 PWM
61 2.00 0.15 1.00 35.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 150.00 110.00 110 PWM
62 2.00 0.15 1.00 40.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 200.00 110.00 110 PWM
63 2.00 0.15 1.00 35.00 0.00 0.00 110.00 150.00 110.00 110 PWM
64 1.00 0.15 1.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 0.00 0 PWM
65 1.00 0.15 1.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 16.00 255.00 0.00 0 PWM
-----
If you look at the low_lim column, you need to modify EVERY PID that is higher than 16.00 to the new limit 16.00 (the command is actually 1600). If the command 'fan info a' doesn't work, this command only views the output of the fan settings the FIRST TIME you ssh into the server. If you logout, that command will not list any output. You must reset your iLO card to get the command to work again. You only need to view the output one time, so that isn't really a deal breaker. Keep in mind every time you reset your iLO (or reboot), you need to reapply the fan settings. Scripting it is key...

You need to enable SSH Key Based authentication to iLO. The easiest way to do this is from a UNIX or Linux host separate from ESXi. This would probably be best run your Mac workstations (as ESXi will delete these keys on reboot), or any other Unix / Linux workstation. I guess you can use Putty, I hate Putty but if you know how to enable key based auth there you can generate your keys there. I will explain how to do it from a Unix desktop like the Mac but that will work for most other *nix workstations. Go into a shell / Terminal prompt. I would recommend first going into your //.ssh to see if it contains the file id_rsa.pub file. If the directory .ssh doesn't exist that is fine. If it exists and you have a id_rsa.pub file in there if you've ever executed this before, skip to step 2 as there is no reason to create new private / public keys on your workstation. If you are unsure how to get into that directory go into a terminal prompt and type 'cd ~/.ssh'. Type 'ls' to see what is in there. If the directory doesn't exist and or you don't have a id_rsa.pub file in there, start following step 1.
Step 1>
From the $ prompt, type:
$ ssh-keygen -t rsa
Press Enter on File location (which will be in your home directory's .ssh directory) (/.ssh))
Press Enter on passphrase (do not password protect the key file unless you know what you are doing)
Press Enter on the confirm passphrase
And you will get something like:
Your identification has been saved in /Users//.ssh/id_rsa.
Your public key has been saved in /Users//.ssh/id_rsa.pub.
The key fingerprint is:
[This will contain random signature for your key]
This step creates a file called id_rsa.pub (and id_rsa) which is needed for the next step. This is your public key which is validated by servers to allow for key based password less authentication. You can use this public key on all servers you log into for key based authentication. Just if you never created this before, you need to create it here.
Step 2>
You need to upload this file into the iLO web console so that you can do Key Based password less logins into iLO.

Go into Administration | Security
Check the Box for Administrator then Click Authorize New Key
Under Public Key Import Data
Do a copy and paste of the id_rsa.pub file you created on the previous step. To view the file, type 'cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub'
It should look something like:
ssh-rsa XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX== [email protected]
Cut and paste that entire one line of text. If may look like multiple lines if you have word wrap, but it is really a really long one line of text. This is your public ssh key. When your ssh client presents this to the iLO server, the iLO server will know to log you in without a password.
Click Import Public Key and you should be good to go.

Step 3>
From your workstation, type 'ls -la ~/.ssh'
You should see something like:
drwx------ 13 xxx staff 416 Oct 11 18:50 .
drwxr-xr-x+ 69 xxx staff 2208 Oct 12 20:10 ..
-rw-r--r-- 1 xxx staff 820 Oct 8 2019 authorized_keys
-rw-r--r-- 1 xxx staff 103 Oct 8 2019 config
-rw------- 1 xxx staff 1675 Oct 8 2019 id_rsa
-rw-r--r-- 1 xxx staff 400 Oct 8 2019 id_rsa.pub
-rw-r--r-- 1 xxx staff 337292 Oct 11 18:50 known_hosts
Verify that permissions on id_rsa is -rw------- (600) and that the permissions on .ssh are drwx------ (700). It is probably correct if this is the first time you have ever done this. Test to see if your key based authentication from your workstation works by typing

ssh [email protected]

The first time you execute this it will prompt you to cache the ssh finger print. Just accept it and login. Any future time you execute this it should login without prompting for your password from this workstation. It adds this fingerprint to the file ~/.ssh/known_hosts. You will need that data in a future step.

Step 4>

You need to enable ssh on your ESXi server so you can remotely login. Login to the Web UI, go into Manage | Services
Select TSM-SSH in the list and click 'Start' menu

Step 5>
SSH to your ESXi host. You need to edit your /etc/rc.local.d/local.sh script. Since the system wipes out these files on boot, I am having the startup script of esxi create the private and public keys you created on your workstation on every boot. It is a little complicated, but basically you need to create each line of each of those files one line at a time with echo commands added to your local.sh file. Using vi, vim, nano, emacs, or whatever you favorite editor is. You need to basically create the contents of these files.
Basically you have three files which need to be created in ESXi every time it boots because these files get wiped out on reboot. I create them all from my local.sh file.
/.ssh/known_hosts (This needs to contain the cached ssh fingerprint for your iLO. You would need to look in your ~/.ssh/known_hosts file for the line that represents your iLO. There will be an entry in this file for every server you ssh to. Look for the IP address of your iLO to find it). You could try typing 'grep ~/.ssh/known_hosts' to get this. Remember it is one line long but it could word wrap depending on your terminal width.)
/.ssh/id_rsa (This is your private key. You need to create your public key that is on your workstation on the ESX server. It is many lines long and needs to be added one line at a time)
/.ssh/id_rsa.pub (This is your public key. You need also need to create your public key on the ESX server. This file is only a single line long but wraps due to word wrap)
Add the following to the END of that file. This is an examples of what the end of my local.sh file looks like, but I put in XX for my data. You can see the names of which file goes where based on the redirection to the respective file:
# Quiet the Fans
mkdir /.ssh
echo '192.168.Y.Y ssh-rsa XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXx' >/.ssh/known_hosts
echo '-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo '-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----' >>/.ssh/id_rsa
echo 'ssh-rsa XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXx' >> /.ssh/id_rsa.pub
chmod 600 /.ssh/id_rsa
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 27 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 28 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 29 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 30 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 31 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 32 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 33 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 34 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 35 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 36 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 37 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 38 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 42 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 47 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 52 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 53 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected]'fan pid 54 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 55 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 56 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 57 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 58 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 59 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 60 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 61 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 62 lo 1600'
ssh [email protected] 'fan pid 63 lo 1600'
exit 0

If you had other PID's which need to be modified, place them up there as needed. It takes a few minutes for the fan's to slow down, but once they do, they are pretty quiet as long as CPU usage is low and the room is cool enough. Let me know if this helps anyone. The steps can be used for different implementations than ESXi also.
submitted by osxster to homelab

5

Always failing to SSH with Putty and Windows 10 Ubuntu SSH (no authentication methods available [server sent public key])

This weekend I set up an Ubuntu VM with VirtualBox, I got SSH with rsa keys working. Later the next day I set up a DigitalOcean Droplet with working RSA keys. I went to do the same thing with my RaspberryPi3 running Raspbian.
No dice.
It fails in exactly the same way as it would if I had the wrong key on the server. So I created 3 more keys, and then a fourth with Bash on windows. I am really out of ideas, all the tutorials for Raspbian are pretty much identical to the Ubuntu ones. I changed the permissions a billion different ways and restarted between everything. I am completely out of ideas, and everything I google says to start over. I even reloaded the OS from scratch once!
Does anyone have an ideas or has experience something similar?
submitted by ChanceDriven to raspberry_pi